Ehren Reed : June 8th, 2016

20150802_181815

Greetings listeners!

So, I know on the podcast there’s a lot of discussion about the internet and its effect on us as a culture, society, what have you. At this point, I almost feel I’m getting redundant. Of course, at the same time, I feel that the fact that it comes up so often in conversation says something—how it has changed daily life, communication, and creativity. My guest today is another artist who touches on themes of the digital world. Today’s episode is a discussion I had this week with LVA‘s Outreach Programs Coordinator Ehren Reed.

Ehren is a mixed media artist now based in Louisville. Before moving to Louisville, she studied in both Ohio and San Fransisco, where she started work in arts education and outreach. Ever since, Ehren has been deeply involved in community based programs.

Ehren’s artwork explores themes of the intangible, such as memory or digital media. Both of which have a ghostly quality that appears to be there and not at the same time. With her work she makes sense of this, and gives substance to such things by creating mixed media pieces involving embroidery, stitching, and old photography or digital images.

Listen in to our conversation below as we discuss her jump from painting to embroidery & book making, go on and on about StudioWorks, and try to figure out the internet.

To see what Ehren has been up to, art wise, check out her website ehrenreed.com.

Click the player to listen to our discussion.

 

 

 

Patrick Hume / Analog Cannibal : May 4th, 2016

'Ohm: Music For Meditation' album art. Art by James R. Southard

‘Ohm: Music For Meditation’ album art. Art by James R. Southard

Hello listeners.

I find that I’m always draw to experiential art. The kind of art that takes me to a place, or more accurately, a different state of mind. These are usually qualities I aim for in my own output. Even the process of art is just that—when you get into the ‘zone’, and you’ve got tunnel vision, losing yourself in it. It’s like meditating, or at least some form of meditation.

Patrick Hume’s latest work under the Analog Cannibal moniker dwells on these ideas. Ohm: Music For Meditation, out now on Little Heart Records, is his latest release. The music on the album was made with a joking nod to department store New Age music displays, but the work isn’t a joke. It’s serious work that is aptly named, and is conducive to peaceful environments.

Patrick has been involved in Louisville’s music scene for quite a time. At one point, he was deep in the hardcore scene with bands such as Lords, Abscise, and Brain Banger. Not too long after, he started producing work under the name Analog Cannibal, and hasn’t stopped. When he isn’t teaching guitar, Patrick is more than likely adding to his extensive catalog. He seems to have an insane work ethic, that leads to tons of material.

Analog Cannibal is definitely a project with an eclectic discography, but this is definitely a noticeable shift sonically, and it stands out. Patrick isn’t sure how much more he’s willing to explore this sound but he isn’t writing it off quite yet. He said he certainly got lost in recording these pieces, and thinks on these experiences fondly. Whether tongue-in-cheek or not, Patrick’s attempt definitely hits its mark.

The album is being package as a download code & poster with art by James Southard. You can see more of his work at jamesrsouthard.com.

You can find out more about Patrick’s musical output via the Analog Cannibal website or bandcamp page.

And as always, you can find our chat below or find Blind Date in the iTunes store. We chat about space, various studies on auditory stimuli, and King Crimson.

Enjoy.

Claire Krueger : April 6th, 2016

Hey listeners!

Sarah and I are on ‘Spring Break’ this week, and I’m posting from Joshua Tree, California. It is so beautiful and serene out here…

Anyway, my guest today is Claire Krueger. We chatted about film, perfectionism, and our issues with patience & commitment…(I’m somewhat kidding about my patience.)

Though Claire dabbles in many forms of art, film is the main emphasis of her creative output. Many of her films are mixed media, or maybe a better way to say it is mixed techniques—such as diorama sets, green screening, and animation. Visually, there is usually vibrant colors and dreamlike imagery (see her film ‘The Passenger’ above.)

As you may gather from the interview, there is a wit and humor to Claire. This definitely shows in her work, in subtle ways. It’s something I really appreciate about her art. Along with this well executed wit, I think there is a certain amount of mystery and vagueness to her work that leaves the audience with questions. I feel this works in her favor, bringing the viewer back again and again.

locus_4WEB

Image from Claire’s installation ‘Locus’. Image via Claire’s website.

Give our discussion a listen, to understand more about Claire and her work. You can also visit her website, clairekrueger.com as well as her vimeo.

As always, find the podcast below. Enjoy.

StudioWorks, Donna Sherley : March 2nd, 2016

 "Get Together and do Artwork and Instrumental" by Donna Sherley

“Get Together and do Artwork and Instrumental” by Donna Sherley

Hey there listeners!

This is the last episode in my series on StudioWorks.

You know, I saw so many familiar friendly faces at the ‘Reflections’ opening last week. Many of which were StudioWorks artists, the staff, as well as outside creatives…I had such a wonderful time. That exhibition seem to bring so many people together, much like StudioWorks itself. It was a diverse environment, and something I’d love to see on a larger scale.

To say the least, I enjoyed working on this series so much and I hope to revisit it in the future as they grow and expand. I just want to everyone at StudioWorks.

A page from a book repurposed by Donna.

A page from a book repurposed by Donna.

My guest today is Donna Sherley. Donna’s art consists of vibrantly colored paintings and illustrations with a upbeat flair. Other mediums she has explored is paper weaving, clay, and found objects such as the repurposing of old books.
Donna has been with StudioWorks for a long time and enjoys her work there. StudioWorks helps her expand upon her skills as well as give her connections to other parts of Louisville’s art community. She hopes to soon land an arts related job.

You can learn more about Donna’s work from her blog or Zoom Group’s webpage.

You can hear our short chat below.

Enjoy!

StudioWorks, Jeremy Smith: February 3rd, 2016

Jeremy posing with his rendition of X-men character 'Wolverine'. Photo via StudioWorks

Jeremy posing with his rendition of X-men character ‘Wolverine’. Photo via StudioWorks

Hello again, listeners.

I finally got a chance to run by StudioWorks since their expansion—and it looks great. I just stopped in to grab some photos and look around. I haven’t been in a while, so I thought it was about time again.

Some of the pieces I photographed were works by Jeremy Smith.

Jeremy’s art style is rich with comic book influences as well as animation and fantasy art. His creativity was encouraged by artistic family members and friends from an early age. He has been making work professionally at StudioWorks for about eight years.

Jeremy’s methods are mostly tradition pencil and ink, though he has dabbled in using digital technology to enhance some works. The subject matter of his work mainly is made up of hyper muscular individuals, superheroes, and the sort.

Another work by Jeremy Smith

Another work by Jeremy Smith

Jeremy hopes one day to do his own comic, or at least get his fan art in the back of someone else’s. I feel he is on the right path—he has made his own ‘Yu-Gi-Oh’ cards, greeting cards, and of course several large scale pieces housed at StudioWorks.

You can visit StudioWorks at Zoomgroup.org or the StudioWorks Facebook page to learn about Jeremy and the rest of the crew.

You can listen to our chat below.

Enjoy guys.

StudioWorks, Julie Baldyga: January 6th, 2016

Happy New Year listeners. I hope everyone is having a nice winter so far. I hope you’re all staying warm, staying safe…

Today we’re getting even deeper into my series of StudioWorks artists with guest Julie Baldyga. I feel that most of Julie’s work centers around her interest in how things work—be it people or machines.

Julie’s body of work is mostly made up of oil pastel scenes of mechanics working on various machines. The figures in her pieces tend to be women engineers, scientists, and mechanics. She says her interest in machinery came from her father’s job working in a whiskey bottling plant, when she was a child.

Julie’s work also consist of many three dimensional pieces, like her life sized sculptures called ‘Heavenly People’.  ‘Heavenly People’ are sculptures of friends, family, and celebrities as Julie imagines they will look in heaven. Many of the first sculptures came with skeletal systems, arteries, and organs that she made from various wire & found materials. Julie has made numerous sculptures like these (as seen above in the video courtesy of Tom Stagg via Youtube.)

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

To learn more about Julie, you can check out these links:

StudioWorks Facebook page

‘The Expressive Art Of Julie Baldyga’

Julie guest appearance on LVA’s radio show PUBLIC, from their archive

Zoomgroup.org

Of course, once you’re done with all that, listen to our chat below.

Enjoy.

 

StudioWorks, Eric Huggins : December 2nd, 2015

Eric showing me some of his celebrity portraits.

Eric showing me some of his celebrity portraits.

Continuing my series on StudioWorks, today’s episode features Eric Huggins.

Eric is a soft spoken guy, but super friendly—he always seems to have a smile on his face. His artwork reflects that upbeat disposition with his color usage & subject matter. Eric’s work is inspired by his love of music, especially Motown, and usually comes in the form of celebrity portraits. Aside from his colorful portraits, Eric dabbles in tattoo influenced work as well.

More of Eric’s work. Photo from StudioWorks’ Facebook page. I love that embroidered Elvis.

Eric is a self taught artist who’s been at it for over 20 years now. Quite a bit of those years have been spent learning and experimenting at StudioWorks, which has given him the opportunity to try new things as well as pass down his experience to children at the Pitt Academy. Eric teaches an art class about once a month with Pitt Academy students.

I also hear rumor that Eric and another local creative, Lindsay Sant, are working on an animation project together. I’ll keep you updated when I hear more…

You can learn more about Eric and the rest of the StudioWorks crew at Zoomgroup.org or the StudioWorks’ Facebook page.

Check out our chat below.

Enjoy…