Sophia Gordon : May 6th, 2015

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

Greetings listeners.

I feel as an artist, you’re always trying to push your materials (and yourself) to their limits. And of course, this is where the creativity comes in handy; using what you have available to reach as close as you can to your visualized goals. As technology progresses and makes certain mediums more accessible this becomes easier. I believe that the surprises that come while reaching for your ‘vision’ are more interesting than the original idea.

These are some ideas discussed in the opening of my chat with Sophia Gordon.

Sophia is a Louisville native who graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design with a BFA in Film & Television Production. She enjoys experimenting with various mediums and different ways of mixing them. This kind of creative mentality stems from her experiences making zines when she was younger. The very collaborative, cut & paste, and DIY nature of zine creation stayed with her. Zine creation, going back to what I said above, also teaches you to use what you have on hand wisely.

Her collaborative experiments continue in her current work with her films, photography, visual art, and her performance art duo RabbitxRabbit.

Listen in to our conversation below, or subscribe through iTunes. We talk Oblique Strategies, I get too excited about getting the Frankenstein reference, and hear some of the improvised music from her duo (the closing track really has a Popol Vuh kind of feel. I love it!)

See what Sophia has done, and will do, via her website Sophiagordonart.com.

Friendly discussion…

07

Recently, there was an article in the New Yorker about the influence of Brian Eno. He had this to say of the art schools he studied ‘I thought that art schools should just be places where you thought about creative behavior, whereas they thought an art school was a place where you made painters,”…..

John Waters had this to say of his short stay at New York University, where he was to study film ‘NYU…I was there for about five minutes. I don’t know what I was thinking about. I went to one class and they kept talking about Potemkin and that isn’t what I wanted to talk about. I had just gone to see Olga’s House of Shame. That was what I was more into.’

So, what are your thoughts on art school? Yea? Nay? Great opportunity or financial waste? Do you think people can be taught art? Can a mentor encourage the ‘creative spirit’?

What do you think are the benefits and the pitfalls of such creative institutions?

Be polite, but speak up if you have some thoughts on the matter.

Keep it kind and courteous.

Mind your manners, etc, etc….

PS. Next week I’ll be giving you guys an actual interview again. This time with local sax blowin’, guitar shreddin’, record store entrepreneur Jim Marlowe. We talk about his creative venture such as Tropical Trash, about Astro Black Records, and music in general.

Stay tuned.

 

 

Surprise! (April 9th 2014)

7.5.13-D_800        7.8.13-N_800

What’s going on, listeners?

As I mentioned last week, this month I’m giving you an extra episode…an extra discussion with a special guest. Today, I’m here to deliver with a pleasant conversation with my creative better half (as they say), Sarah Katherine Davis. I’d definitely say we do a good job of balancing each other out. I push her to think outside of her creative safety zone..go places she usually wouldn’t. On the other side of that, she wrangles my ideas in with giving me more structure and organization. Much like the other aspects of our life together, art is now more of an team effort; if anything, we always have an open, encouraging, and honest source to bounce ideas off of. No matter how absurd my ideas are.

Anyway, to celebrate our first wedding anniversary, I bullied her into talking to me about her photography. Sarah has been involved in photography since a young age, both creatively and commercially as a wedding photographer. Besides this, she teaches digital photography classes as a part of the CFAC program for the Louisville Visual Art Assn, where she is also employed as the Education Programs Coordinator.

Sarah’s work at times romanticizes moments while others show the open, honest realness. With her images she likes to reveal and relate to how others live, but also opens up her own life with projects such as 10/10 (the images above are samples from that series). This project is just as much about giving you a look into her life as it is recording it. The underlining themes of the project seem to be self reflection and progress; where you’ve been and where you’re going. Much of what Sarah does commercially and art wise fit into these parameters regardless of who she is documenting.

As far as medium her photography is mostly digital, though she still has interest in physical film and Polaroids as art objects. Unfortunately, the growing cost of the physical side of photography makes it difficult for her to do more film work, as it does for most photographers. She definitely sees the positive sides of digital advancements though.

To learn more about Sarah’s work, you can go to Sarahkatherinedavis.com.

Enjoy the interview below!

Age of Aquarius..

If you’ve been listening to NPR, you’ve probably heard quite a few stories lately about aging. Speaking of which, a question for you Blind Date bloggers…is 28 still a young age? Relatively young?

I only ask this as a transition to something I’ve pondered often, which is how to stay motivated and creative as you age…I wonder often if I’ll keep creating as I ripen and my responsibilities increase. There are many artists I admire who seem (or seemed) to stay quite prolific in this sense; such as Moondog (aka The Viking of 6th Avenue), the blind musician and instrument creator. Or the ambient music loving multimedia artist Brian Eno. He has been turning up more than ever lately, even at the age of 65. And Mrs Laurie Anderson who is right up there with him at 66!

If you grant some of your time, I’d like to talk about two more artists creating well into their lives. The first I’d like to talk about is an artist who is definitely at the top of my list. Still spry at the age of 85, is Alejandro Jodorowsky. Jodorowsky is an avant-garde filmmaker, playwright, actor, author, musician, comics writer and admirer of the Tarot. He is probably best known for his psychedelic masterpiece The Holy Mountain (fun fact: this was funded by John Lennon) and acid western, El Topo (The Mole). He was also slated to director the Dune movie adaptation, which sadly didn’t happen (there’s a documentary about Jodorowsky’s concept for Dune. Check out the trailer here.)

Though he refers to himself as an ‘atheist mystic’ much of his work focuses on religion and spirituality as well as violence, sexuality, psychedelia, and his childhood. And just last year his newest film The Dance of Reality (La danza de la realidad) was shown at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival with a standing ovation. The film is based on the autobiography of the same title. The film blends Jodorowsky’s personal history with metaphor, mythology and poetry, reflecting his view that reality is not objective but rather a “dance” created by our imaginations. Besides all this, he also finds time for lectures and writing about his personally created spiritual system known as ‘psychomagic’ or ‘psychoshamanism’. He is a machine…a creative bullet train.

The next artist I want to talk about you may already known of if you follow music news at all. Her name is Linda Perhacs. I just recently discovered her through her ever growing media coverage. Her’s is an interesting story. Speaking of age, the more elder of my readers may remember her album release in 1970, Parallelogram. Unfortunately, it was a commercial flop.

As the story goes, Perhacs was a dental hygienist in California. And many of the teeth she cleaned happened to belong to some rather famous people, including film composer Leonard Rosenman who helped her get the record deal to record her debut.

Slowly but surely, despite the lack of commercial success, Parallelogram turned into a cult following and in turn influenced many of today’s musicians in the more experimental side of the folk scene.  Now, forty four years later at the age of 70, she has released her sophomore album, The Soul of All Natural Things, to much praise. Above is a music video for one of the tracks off her new release.

I hope that I can someday reach this point of achievement…leaving a life spanning body of work. I’d love to know your opinions and thoughts on this…readers of any age! How do you remain creatively focused and inspired with each passing year? What techniques do you use to keep fresh? How do you keep your adult responsibilities from clashing with your creative ones? I’d love to see some dialogue in regards to this on either the blog, Tumblr, or Facebook.

Oh yeah, PS. If you’re privy to what’s happening in Louisville’s music scene, then you’re probably already acquainted with my guests for March..the band Black Birds Of Paradise. Since I talked to them, they’ve had many bits of press, showed up on a local news channel, and celebrated their debut album release at the New Vintage. Be sure to listen in at the end of the month for our discussion.

February 26th 2014

Hey Blind Date listeners! Rejoice, for it is the last Wednesday of the month which means another interview.

If you’ve been keeping up, you’ll know today’s guest is local filmmaker Max Moore. Above is a video he did for the band O’Brother, for their song ‘Transience’.

Max has an ever growing body of work; a great deal of which is music videos for many international known musicians and groups.  Speaking of things international, he has also shown narrative work in film festivals all over.

You can learn more at his website, maxmoorefilms.com. To get further insight into Max, listen to our discussion…there’s a handy player below or you could always subscribe to the podcast (subscribe, subscribe, subscribe!) Below the player is his short ‘Eight’. Enjoy!

Meet Max Moore…

I thought I’d give you some information on Max before airing our discussion next week. Above is a teaser clip of his work you can also see on his website, Max Moore Films.

Max Moore is a filmmaker from Louisville who has been recognized on both a national and international level. He received his Bachelor of Arts-Film Studies in 2013, but has been experimenting with film almost since he was very young. Naturally with his involvement in the Louisville Hardcore and Punk scene, he coupled that with his film work which started an increasingly successful career in music videos.  He has worked with locals such as Coliseum and Xerxes, as well as nationals such as Touche Amore and Converge.

Of course, you shouldn’t pigeonhole him. Max’s body of work also contains more narrative shorts that has been accepted into academy qualifying and international film festivals across the United States and Europe. He also has experience in documentary work like the piece ‘ Allen County Oral History “The Golden Horseshoe” ‘.

You can learn more and see his talents at maxmoorefilms.com …or ( of course) you can listen in to our discussion I’ll be posting next Wednesday, February 26th! You won’t regret it.

Till then…

October 23, 2013

'Sirius A and Pups' by Alexia Serpentini

‘Sirius A and Pups’ by Alexia Serpentini

Hello there listeners.

Are you ready for this!? Special extended episode! I won’t judge you if you can’t take it all in with one sitting. That’s why you should subscribe to the podcast!! Anytime, anywhere, straight through, or take your time…at your convenience. Available in iTunes store.

Today’s episode of Blind Date features a good friend, the always warm, the always inspirational, Alexia Serpentini. I forget sometimes how similar we are, as well as how similar our goals are. It’s via Skype, so the sound quality is little funky. Such is Skype.

Alexia received two BFAs from the University of Louisville; one in 2D and one in 3D art. Currently she is a MA Creative Cities Candidate at King’s College London, in the United Kingdom.  Her focus is Post-Conflict Cultural Policy Development in the Middle East, Egyptian Cultural Regulation. Alexia has done work such as glass sculpture, film, photography, installation, and experiential pieces.

We touch on things such as education, creative solutions to socio-political matters, and briefly on my motivations for Blind Date. Figures an interview with Alexia would turn out different.

See samples of her work either at cargocollective.com/alexiaserpentini, or on November 11th, at the first ever Blind Date hosted event.

LIVE. In person. Artists. Musicians. Film.

Click through the following links for more information:

https://www.facebook.com/events/646093162088300/

https://www.facebook.com/blinddateart

blinddateart.wordpress.com

cliftoncenter.org

I hope to see you there!