StudioWorks, Eric Huggins : December 2nd, 2015

Eric showing me some of his celebrity portraits.

Eric showing me some of his celebrity portraits.

Continuing my series on StudioWorks, today’s episode features Eric Huggins.

Eric is a soft spoken guy, but super friendly—he always seems to have a smile on his face. His artwork reflects that upbeat disposition with his color usage & subject matter. Eric’s work is inspired by his love of music, especially Motown, and usually comes in the form of celebrity portraits. Aside from his colorful portraits, Eric dabbles in tattoo influenced work as well.

More of Eric’s work. Photo from StudioWorks’ Facebook page. I love that embroidered Elvis.

Eric is a self taught artist who’s been at it for over 20 years now. Quite a bit of those years have been spent learning and experimenting at StudioWorks, which has given him the opportunity to try new things as well as pass down his experience to children at the Pitt Academy. Eric teaches an art class about once a month with Pitt Academy students.

I also hear rumor that Eric and another local creative, Lindsay Sant, are working on an animation project together. I’ll keep you updated when I hear more…

You can learn more about Eric and the rest of the StudioWorks crew at Zoomgroup.org or the StudioWorks’ Facebook page.

Check out our chat below.

Enjoy…

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Joshua Jenkins : July 1st, 2015

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A Portrait of Five” by Joshua Jenkins. Just to give you an idea of scale, the dimensions are 64x59in.

Looking at Joshua’s work, his influences seem to span many styles, places, and periods—a love of Picasso, bits of the Harlem Renaissance, and street art. He also acknowledges what the classic painters have passed down to us, though he’s far from a traditionalist.

Greetings listeners.

Today, I’m talking about Joshua Jenkins. Joshua is a freelance artist and the coordinator for the LVA‘s Artebella program. His work tends to be large scale, mixed media abstracts that range from portraits to scenes of daily life. Joshua’s interest in art grew when he discovered Picasso’s prolific body of work. For him, this was a realization of what art could be was much more than the classic Renaissance painters.

Joshua uses a very layered technique blending text, color fields, and abstract figures, all with a very bold and expressive brushstroke.

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‘Portrait of a King 2’ by Joshua Jenkins.

You can get a better understanding of his work at www.joshjenkins.com or www.facebook.com/joshuajenkinsart.

Listen to our chat using the player below.

Enjoy.

Sophia Gordon : May 6th, 2015

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

Greetings listeners.

I feel as an artist, you’re always trying to push your materials (and yourself) to their limits. And of course, this is where the creativity comes in handy; using what you have available to reach as close as you can to your visualized goals. As technology progresses and makes certain mediums more accessible this becomes easier. I believe that the surprises that come while reaching for your ‘vision’ are more interesting than the original idea.

These are some ideas discussed in the opening of my chat with Sophia Gordon.

Sophia is a Louisville native who graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design with a BFA in Film & Television Production. She enjoys experimenting with various mediums and different ways of mixing them. This kind of creative mentality stems from her experiences making zines when she was younger. The very collaborative, cut & paste, and DIY nature of zine creation stayed with her. Zine creation, going back to what I said above, also teaches you to use what you have on hand wisely.

Her collaborative experiments continue in her current work with her films, photography, visual art, and her performance art duo RabbitxRabbit.

Listen in to our conversation below, or subscribe through iTunes. We talk Oblique Strategies, I get too excited about getting the Frankenstein reference, and hear some of the improvised music from her duo (the closing track really has a Popol Vuh kind of feel. I love it!)

See what Sophia has done, and will do, via her website Sophiagordonart.com.

DH McNabb : March 11th, 2015

Photo provided by artist

Photo provided by artist

Listeners.

Think about your day.

How many times did you encounter glass, be it window, mirror, or screen?  I’m sure it’s more times than you can count; glass is everywhere, it surrounds us. And I think this has most of us take it for granted. If you stop to think about it, glass can be quite ‘magical’ visually. It serves many purposes. And it can be many things; transparent or reflective, fragile or protective.

DH McNabb has spent much time pondering this medium, unlike most.

DH came to Kentucky in 99, starting undergrad at Centre college with ideas of becoming a Vet or Naturalist. He soon shifted his interest to glass blowing as he realized that it could provide him with what he was looking for in these vocations—travel. Glass is ubiquitous, and glass blowing almost as much. As someone with a taste for exploration and beliefs in the community of art, DH fit in perfectly with glass making.

DH creates glass works that range from the functional to the conceptual; much of it is an overlapping of the two extremes. And for him it’s the same, because the creative, intellectual moment happened. Conceptually, DH is interested in the ephemeral nature of things, the loss of a ‘moment’. He explores such concepts with his project Poof! and further for his exhibition Monuments: Moments. As he mentions, monuments were these things, these ideas, that were meant to last but are just as temporal as the moment of passing from one room to the next.

DH is currently working at the Flame Run glass studio and gallery.

You can see his work at dhmcnabb.com.

Click the player below to hear our discussion.

Till next time.

Nathan Hendrickson : January 28th 2015

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Nathan’s piece ‘Suzy Homemaker’.

Hello listeners.

My guest today is creative Nathaniel Hendrickson. Nathan has had his hand in art as creator, performer, and curator. He received a B.A. from Bellarmine University in 2012, and has since been shown in a large variety of exhibitions as well as curated for the Land of Tomorrow gallery space.

Our conversation left me with much to think about, and I believe this feeling aptly sums up the nature of Nathan’s work. Much of his work provokes thought through the communication of significant images. Nathan feels pictures can be quite powerful in our increasingly heavy image economy.

The themes of his work are often colored by his daily reflections of mass culture and his appetite for research— especially the subject of psychology. His newest exhibition at Swanson Contemporary, Surrogate Surface, was inspired by Harry Harlow’s studies with rhesus monkeys.

The show runs till February 14th.

Learn more about Nathan’s various works at his website http://nathanielhendrickson.com.

As always check out our discussion using the player below or subscribe to the podcast via iTunes.

 

Collin Lloyd : December 3rd 2014

Winter is upon us listeners. How are you fairing? Well, I hope…

Today’s guest is Collin Lloyd. The above video piece is a collaboration between him and his spouse Alexia Serpentini. If you guys remember, I spoke to Alexia during the first year of Blind Date. And much like her interview, we ended up talking for quite awhile, going all over the place. With that said, you may need to be ready to get comfy for this one, or make this two sittings…

Collin’s work centers around themes of masculinity, femininity, gender, identity construction, and his inner life. Besides his sculpture and performance work, he has been writing a novel based on his dreams which form a consistent ongoing story. As you’ll hear in our discussion, narratives are something quite close to his heart as well as his work. We also touch on gender inequality and its results in many parts of culture.

You can learn more about his work at his website, collinlloyd.com.

Happy listening…

Surprise! (April 9th 2014)

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What’s going on, listeners?

As I mentioned last week, this month I’m giving you an extra episode…an extra discussion with a special guest. Today, I’m here to deliver with a pleasant conversation with my creative better half (as they say), Sarah Katherine Davis. I’d definitely say we do a good job of balancing each other out. I push her to think outside of her creative safety zone..go places she usually wouldn’t. On the other side of that, she wrangles my ideas in with giving me more structure and organization. Much like the other aspects of our life together, art is now more of an team effort; if anything, we always have an open, encouraging, and honest source to bounce ideas off of. No matter how absurd my ideas are.

Anyway, to celebrate our first wedding anniversary, I bullied her into talking to me about her photography. Sarah has been involved in photography since a young age, both creatively and commercially as a wedding photographer. Besides this, she teaches digital photography classes as a part of the CFAC program for the Louisville Visual Art Assn, where she is also employed as the Education Programs Coordinator.

Sarah’s work at times romanticizes moments while others show the open, honest realness. With her images she likes to reveal and relate to how others live, but also opens up her own life with projects such as 10/10 (the images above are samples from that series). This project is just as much about giving you a look into her life as it is recording it. The underlining themes of the project seem to be self reflection and progress; where you’ve been and where you’re going. Much of what Sarah does commercially and art wise fit into these parameters regardless of who she is documenting.

As far as medium her photography is mostly digital, though she still has interest in physical film and Polaroids as art objects. Unfortunately, the growing cost of the physical side of photography makes it difficult for her to do more film work, as it does for most photographers. She definitely sees the positive sides of digital advancements though.

To learn more about Sarah’s work, you can go to Sarahkatherinedavis.com.

Enjoy the interview below!