StudioWorks, Julie Baldyga: January 6th, 2016

Happy New Year listeners. I hope everyone is having a nice winter so far. I hope you’re all staying warm, staying safe…

Today we’re getting even deeper into my series of StudioWorks artists with guest Julie Baldyga. I feel that most of Julie’s work centers around her interest in how things work—be it people or machines.

Julie’s body of work is mostly made up of oil pastel scenes of mechanics working on various machines. The figures in her pieces tend to be women engineers, scientists, and mechanics. She says her interest in machinery came from her father’s job working in a whiskey bottling plant, when she was a child.

Julie’s work also consist of many three dimensional pieces, like her life sized sculptures called ‘Heavenly People’.  ‘Heavenly People’ are sculptures of friends, family, and celebrities as Julie imagines they will look in heaven. Many of the first sculptures came with skeletal systems, arteries, and organs that she made from various wire & found materials. Julie has made numerous sculptures like these (as seen above in the video courtesy of Tom Stagg via Youtube.)

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

To learn more about Julie, you can check out these links:

StudioWorks Facebook page

‘The Expressive Art Of Julie Baldyga’

Julie guest appearance on LVA’s radio show PUBLIC, from their archive

Zoomgroup.org

Of course, once you’re done with all that, listen to our chat below.

Enjoy.

 

Nathan Hendrickson : January 28th 2015

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Nathan’s piece ‘Suzy Homemaker’.

Hello listeners.

My guest today is creative Nathaniel Hendrickson. Nathan has had his hand in art as creator, performer, and curator. He received a B.A. from Bellarmine University in 2012, and has since been shown in a large variety of exhibitions as well as curated for the Land of Tomorrow gallery space.

Our conversation left me with much to think about, and I believe this feeling aptly sums up the nature of Nathan’s work. Much of his work provokes thought through the communication of significant images. Nathan feels pictures can be quite powerful in our increasingly heavy image economy.

The themes of his work are often colored by his daily reflections of mass culture and his appetite for research— especially the subject of psychology. His newest exhibition at Swanson Contemporary, Surrogate Surface, was inspired by Harry Harlow’s studies with rhesus monkeys.

The show runs till February 14th.

Learn more about Nathan’s various works at his website http://nathanielhendrickson.com.

As always check out our discussion using the player below or subscribe to the podcast via iTunes.

 

Shapin/Nicolas Collection : January 7th, 2015

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Happy New Year listeners!

I hope you enjoy the first episode of 2015. I’d like to introduce today’s guests with this thought: When thinking about the art world I think it’s easy to forget about those who collect art, because frankly, there aren’t a lot of individuals who do it…at least not seriously. And considering certain economic and logistic factors such as mounting, physical space, etc it makes sense that collecting is a dying trend. After artists, the most important thing to make up a ‘scene’ is a forum for displaying and viewing work, which needs funds to survive. My guests certainly understand these issues, and are doing their part in helping our city’s creative culture.

Today’s chat is with Larry Shapin and Ladonna Nicolas. Larry and Ladonna own work from over 300 Kentucky based artists; most of which are right here in Louisville. Their collection has grown so large that they built an addition onto their home to display the works. Both of them come from art backgrounds, are educated in creative fields, and Larry’s mother is one of the founding members of the Speed Art Museum. In saying that, Larry has been exposed to art from a very young age and continued to support it as an adult.

We discuss the importance of having personal relationships with artists, future plans for their space, up & coming creatives, and Louisville’s art scene.

I’d like to personally thank them for being such a great source of encouragement and support for our city’s artists. Give our discussion a listen and I think you’ll agree.

Till next time.