Jesi Evans : June 3rd, 2015

At First There Is Movement by Jesi Evans. Photo credit to Sarah Davis.

At First There Is Movement by Jesi Evans. Photo credit to Sarah Davis.

How are you, listeners?

Despite certain difficulties, I am here with another discussion as promised. If I sound exasperated in the interview, it’s because my computer froze during the first take…

Today’s guest is an old friend of mine, Jesi Evans. Our friendship is very much seeped in art—we met in High School art class, have shared interests regarding art & music, and have gone on to collaborate through our fledgling collective Hot Garbage.

Jesi is a Berea college grad that works primarily in fibers, with a special emphasis on embroidery. Jesi uses this rather ‘familiar’ medium to redefines craft for herself, as well as the viewer. The medium is familiar and welcoming to her due to a childhood full of projects with her mother & grandmother.

Her latest series of work delves into personal environmental concerns and the emotional response tied to them. The project is right now a work in progress, but you can get a peek at jesievansart.com. You can check out her past projects at her Cargo Collective site.

Sooner Or Later You'll Have To Go To Sleep by Jesi Evans. Photo credit Sarah Davis

Sooner Or Later You’ll Have To Go To Sleep by Jesi Evans. Photo credit Sarah Davis

For a more in-depth introduction, check out her websites and our chat using the player below.

Remember, you can always subscribe to the podcast via iTunes and keep up to date when new episodes are posted.

Till next time.

 

 

Sophia Gordon : May 6th, 2015

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

A still life photo by Sophia Gordon.

Greetings listeners.

I feel as an artist, you’re always trying to push your materials (and yourself) to their limits. And of course, this is where the creativity comes in handy; using what you have available to reach as close as you can to your visualized goals. As technology progresses and makes certain mediums more accessible this becomes easier. I believe that the surprises that come while reaching for your ‘vision’ are more interesting than the original idea.

These are some ideas discussed in the opening of my chat with Sophia Gordon.

Sophia is a Louisville native who graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design with a BFA in Film & Television Production. She enjoys experimenting with various mediums and different ways of mixing them. This kind of creative mentality stems from her experiences making zines when she was younger. The very collaborative, cut & paste, and DIY nature of zine creation stayed with her. Zine creation, going back to what I said above, also teaches you to use what you have on hand wisely.

Her collaborative experiments continue in her current work with her films, photography, visual art, and her performance art duo RabbitxRabbit.

Listen in to our conversation below, or subscribe through iTunes. We talk Oblique Strategies, I get too excited about getting the Frankenstein reference, and hear some of the improvised music from her duo (the closing track really has a Popol Vuh kind of feel. I love it!)

See what Sophia has done, and will do, via her website Sophiagordonart.com.

Shands Collection : April 1st, 2015

Petah Coyne's Untitled (Al's Garden). Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis

Petah Coyne’s Untitled (Al’s Garden). Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis

Hello listeners.

As you know, earlier in the year I talked about the importance of art collecting on the art community with Larry Shapin & Ladonna Nicolas. And thanks to that interview I was invited to the estate of Al and Mary Shands, Great Meadows. The Shands’ home is nestled in a more woodsy area of Crestwood, in the midst of quiet expansive fields. To say the least, it is an amazing spot for a home built specifically for living with, and reflecting on, a large art collection.

Another shot by Sarah Katherine Davis. In the foreground is an Anish Kapoor piece.

Another shot by Sarah Katherine Davis. In the foreground is Anish Kapoor’s Untitled (Yellow Wall Disk).

Great Meadows is home to hundreds of pieces of art, much of which are large scale sculptures. The house was designed to accommodate such pieces, while also being a home and social gathering place. As an Episcopal preacher, Al Shands is very into the idea of bringing people together, whether it’s socializing or quiet reflection. Shands is someone who delights in exchanging ideas, so with all this in mind, his home is no surprise.

Sol LeWitt's Untitled drawing on the wall of the Shands' living room. Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis.

Sol LeWitt’s Untitled Wall Drawing in the Shands’ living room. Photo by Sarah Katherine Davis.

I spoke with Al Shands and Julien Robson about the collection and the estate. Al Shands will leave the entire collection to The Speed Art Museum upon his passing. Al and Julien worked together within The Speed, and have come together again to produce the book Great Meadows: The Making Of Here, to give people a feel of the home as it is now. Al hopes to help grow The Speed with his gift, and to inspire others to collect with his story.

The beautiful book chronicling the progress of Great Meadows is available here.

Below you can listen to our chat (I apologize for the ‘levels’).

 

 

Happy Birthday to ya….

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So I’ve been putting this together for a little bit, and it seems to finally be falling into place. Blind Date, as I may have mentioned a few times, turns one year old this June. And to mark this small milestone, I put together a little art party.

Friday June 20th at the Rudyard Kipling, we celebrate Blind Date’s first awesome, though at times rocky, year. It’s been really great meeting so many individuals from so many background…both culturally and creatively. To say the least, it has been inspiring. I got the chance to talk to people from all over…artists I know well, not at all, that I’ve admired from afar, and those close to me.

The evening will feature an interesting group of creative folk, such as international known filmmaker Max Moore. Or the first guest I ever had on the show, my close personal friend Ben Traughber (Dream Eye Color Wheel). There will also be poetry readings by both Tristan Palmer of Weirdo Beardos fame, and Erin Keane (who just published a new collection of poems titled Demolition of the Promised Land.) And I can’t forget the always impressive Chervon Koeune.

The show starts at 7pm, with a suggested donation of $ 5-10 ( help cover the cost of the sound guy )
Please stay tuned, as details are subject to change. Even if you’re not planning on coming (though you should), pass the word around to people you like and dislike. Friends, family, enemies, co workers, peers of all types….
And if anyone would like to help to promote this event in their neighborhood, organization, school, etc, send me a personal message and I’ll get some flyers your way. I would greatly appreciate it, because I’d like to make this event great for you, my audience, and for my artists.
If you’d like to RSVP, go to the Facebook page. And, by the way, there links hidden all throughout the above paragraphs to each of the artists’ posts. Check them out, and get familiar or reacquainted. 
Till then..
 

 

 

May 7th, 2014

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Art is a lot about reimagining. Using different images and symbols in new ways, to convey new meanings; collaging what we know and expanding upon it. I think this is definitely more evident than ever with the increasingly frequent use of sampling…whether it be audio, video, or other mediums. We’ve come to the point now where many artists solely rely on this…sometimes to poke fun at tradition or to reminisce about the past.

These kinds of ideas rolled about while I conversed with today’s guest. To continue entertaining you while we count down to the anniversary party, I bring you prolific recording artist Alex Koenig. Alex records under the name Nmesh, and our discussion mainly focuses on his two latest releases, ‘Dream Sequins’ and ‘Nu Wav. Hallucinations’. These albums are heavily layered audio collages of media from the 80’s and 90’s…everything from pop music, advertisements, news clips, and video game sound effects. For Alex, it’s equal parts nostalgia and irony.

I caught wind of Alex’s work while I was perusing the album reviews on the site Tiny Mix Tapes. The cover of Dream Sequins caught my eye and as I streamed the audio, it caught my ear. I noticed an audio clip from one of our local news stations, and so here we are.

You can find his vast body of work here.

Enjoy our discussion below.

Music to my ears

Good afternoon, readers..bloggers, what have you…

I feel like my favorite kind of music is the kind that creates more of an environment…a place, instead of a song. My next two coming up guests do just that, but in different ways.

Alex Koenig’s latest work through his music project NMesh are dense soundscapes of audio pulled from various media of the 80’s & 90’s. I told him it reminded me of a ‘haunted Youtube loop’. His newest release, Dream Sequins, has been getting a pretty healthy dose of positive press.

You can listen to it, as well as his other many albums, at the NMesh Bandcamp. Alex’s episode will air May 7th.

Coming up May 28th will be the force behind Phourist, Nick Hill. Phourist sometimes has a ‘dark concert hall sound’, and others a rock structure with narratives that will get you daydreaming. You can hear his work at his website or catch him at The Rudyard Kipling tonight. The show starts around 8, with a five dollar cover charge.

Possibilities for the upcoming months….

Maybe a retro-futuristic sculptor, with heavy symbolism.

Possibly filmmakers of a different variety, who make videos created with the goal of invoking some kind of feeling.

Definitely a crazy event showcasing creative folks worth celebrating.

If you’re lucky…a pretty familiar face, for those eccentric record nerds hanging around the city.

I’ll leave you with these encouraging words.

Cheers!

March 26th, 2014

Good afternoon,  listeners.

It’s the end of the month…time to make good on my promises…

And per my promise last week, today’s episode is with local music makers Black Birds of Paradise. BBOP is made up of John Lewis, Dashiell Moss, and power percussion duo Nick & Regan Layman. I’m sure some of these names are familiar, seeing how these guys have been around the music community for some time, in some shape or form.

Just today they confirmed via Facebook, they are indeed hard at work on their second collection of songs. The release of their debut, B.B.o.P., happened earlier this month. A great event that I’m sure will be proceeded by many more…

Listen in and enjoy!

 

Age of Aquarius..

If you’ve been listening to NPR, you’ve probably heard quite a few stories lately about aging. Speaking of which, a question for you Blind Date bloggers…is 28 still a young age? Relatively young?

I only ask this as a transition to something I’ve pondered often, which is how to stay motivated and creative as you age…I wonder often if I’ll keep creating as I ripen and my responsibilities increase. There are many artists I admire who seem (or seemed) to stay quite prolific in this sense; such as Moondog (aka The Viking of 6th Avenue), the blind musician and instrument creator. Or the ambient music loving multimedia artist Brian Eno. He has been turning up more than ever lately, even at the age of 65. And Mrs Laurie Anderson who is right up there with him at 66!

If you grant some of your time, I’d like to talk about two more artists creating well into their lives. The first I’d like to talk about is an artist who is definitely at the top of my list. Still spry at the age of 85, is Alejandro Jodorowsky. Jodorowsky is an avant-garde filmmaker, playwright, actor, author, musician, comics writer and admirer of the Tarot. He is probably best known for his psychedelic masterpiece The Holy Mountain (fun fact: this was funded by John Lennon) and acid western, El Topo (The Mole). He was also slated to director the Dune movie adaptation, which sadly didn’t happen (there’s a documentary about Jodorowsky’s concept for Dune. Check out the trailer here.)

Though he refers to himself as an ‘atheist mystic’ much of his work focuses on religion and spirituality as well as violence, sexuality, psychedelia, and his childhood. And just last year his newest film The Dance of Reality (La danza de la realidad) was shown at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival with a standing ovation. The film is based on the autobiography of the same title. The film blends Jodorowsky’s personal history with metaphor, mythology and poetry, reflecting his view that reality is not objective but rather a “dance” created by our imaginations. Besides all this, he also finds time for lectures and writing about his personally created spiritual system known as ‘psychomagic’ or ‘psychoshamanism’. He is a machine…a creative bullet train.

The next artist I want to talk about you may already known of if you follow music news at all. Her name is Linda Perhacs. I just recently discovered her through her ever growing media coverage. Her’s is an interesting story. Speaking of age, the more elder of my readers may remember her album release in 1970, Parallelogram. Unfortunately, it was a commercial flop.

As the story goes, Perhacs was a dental hygienist in California. And many of the teeth she cleaned happened to belong to some rather famous people, including film composer Leonard Rosenman who helped her get the record deal to record her debut.

Slowly but surely, despite the lack of commercial success, Parallelogram turned into a cult following and in turn influenced many of today’s musicians in the more experimental side of the folk scene.  Now, forty four years later at the age of 70, she has released her sophomore album, The Soul of All Natural Things, to much praise. Above is a music video for one of the tracks off her new release.

I hope that I can someday reach this point of achievement…leaving a life spanning body of work. I’d love to know your opinions and thoughts on this…readers of any age! How do you remain creatively focused and inspired with each passing year? What techniques do you use to keep fresh? How do you keep your adult responsibilities from clashing with your creative ones? I’d love to see some dialogue in regards to this on either the blog, Tumblr, or Facebook.

Oh yeah, PS. If you’re privy to what’s happening in Louisville’s music scene, then you’re probably already acquainted with my guests for March..the band Black Birds Of Paradise. Since I talked to them, they’ve had many bits of press, showed up on a local news channel, and celebrated their debut album release at the New Vintage. Be sure to listen in at the end of the month for our discussion.

Meet Max Moore…

I thought I’d give you some information on Max before airing our discussion next week. Above is a teaser clip of his work you can also see on his website, Max Moore Films.

Max Moore is a filmmaker from Louisville who has been recognized on both a national and international level. He received his Bachelor of Arts-Film Studies in 2013, but has been experimenting with film almost since he was very young. Naturally with his involvement in the Louisville Hardcore and Punk scene, he coupled that with his film work which started an increasingly successful career in music videos.  He has worked with locals such as Coliseum and Xerxes, as well as nationals such as Touche Amore and Converge.

Of course, you shouldn’t pigeonhole him. Max’s body of work also contains more narrative shorts that has been accepted into academy qualifying and international film festivals across the United States and Europe. He also has experience in documentary work like the piece ‘ Allen County Oral History “The Golden Horseshoe” ‘.

You can learn more and see his talents at maxmoorefilms.com …or ( of course) you can listen in to our discussion I’ll be posting next Wednesday, February 26th! You won’t regret it.

Till then…

December 11th, 2013

Twin Limb playing at Haymarket.

Twin Limb playing at Haymarket. Projections by Spettra.

Enjoying the winter, listeners? I know many of you like myself have been amongst some extreme winter storms; so please stay safe. Stay warm.

Today I bring you a recording of myself, hanging out in the practice space of the duo known as Twin Limb. We decided to do something a little different this time, on account of they haven’t had the chance to record any material. We set up a room mic and I let them play for me like it was my own personal concert (and yours now!), and I asked a few question between songs. Despite what I say in the beginning, I love NPR (don’t get me wrong!).

Twin Limb is a pretty new band, but judging from their rather polished haunting sound, you wouldn’t know it. The group consists of Lacey Guthrie and MaryLiz Guillemi, who before now have played in various groups and solo. Now as their newly found partnership, they’re taking the Louisville music scene by storm. If you’re lucky, you’ve already caught them at one of their many shows. If you have yet to see them, better jump on it while they’re out there playing gigs because soon they’ll be working on recorded material.

If you’re intrigued, you can find out more info at their website. Or at their Facebook page. Recently, these ladies were featured on the video blog ‘This Man Is Not My Father‘. Find the video clips, and more, at one of the many links listed.

Happy Holidays!