Ashley Brossart : September 6th, 2016

Map by Ashley Brossard

Map by Ashley Brossart

Howdy listeners.

The other day I was thinking about how childhood memories, when looking back in retrospect, can be far more significant and formative than you once thought. For Ashley Brossart, one of those memories could be the mural her mother painted in her childhood home’s basement. It contained popular characters borrowed from television and coloring books—Ninja Turtles, Power Rangers, stuff that made up so many 90’s kid’s lives. The influence of this collage style from her mother’s mural can be seen throughout Ashley’s work.

Louisville Map by Ashley Brossart

Louisville Map by Ashley Brossart

Ashley is my guest today. We chatted a little about her work last week in her studio. She is definitely a very hands on artist, and one that has a grasp on many styles & mediums. Her work is a natural consequence of all her experimentation, creating blended works full of movement. Ashley prefers large scale but she also has ongoing, kind of ‘creative geocaching’ projects, called Art Drops. With the Art Drop series ‘Places & Spaces Tucked Away‘, the found pieces recreate a map of sorts.

Ashley’s work tends to focus on how cities are always changing, and how we interact within them. With many of her pieces, she wants to give you the experience of exploring these urban locations. As an advocate of public art, Ashley is also a professional mural artist.

You can more of her work at ashleybrossart.com.

You can listen in to our chat using the player below, or subscribe to Blind Date on iTunes.

Ehren Reed : June 8th, 2016

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Greetings listeners!

So, I know on the podcast there’s a lot of discussion about the internet and its effect on us as a culture, society, what have you. At this point, I almost feel I’m getting redundant. Of course, at the same time, I feel that the fact that it comes up so often in conversation says something—how it has changed daily life, communication, and creativity. My guest today is another artist who touches on themes of the digital world. Today’s episode is a discussion I had this week with LVA‘s Outreach Programs Coordinator Ehren Reed.

Ehren is a mixed media artist now based in Louisville. Before moving to Louisville, she studied in both Ohio and San Fransisco, where she started work in arts education and outreach. Ever since, Ehren has been deeply involved in community based programs.

Ehren’s artwork explores themes of the intangible, such as memory or digital media. Both of which have a ghostly quality that appears to be there and not at the same time. With her work she makes sense of this, and gives substance to such things by creating mixed media pieces involving embroidery, stitching, and old photography or digital images.

Listen in to our conversation below as we discuss her jump from painting to embroidery & book making, go on and on about StudioWorks, and try to figure out the internet.

To see what Ehren has been up to, art wise, check out her website ehrenreed.com.

Click the player to listen to our discussion.

 

 

 

StudioWorks, Julie Baldyga: January 6th, 2016

Happy New Year listeners. I hope everyone is having a nice winter so far. I hope you’re all staying warm, staying safe…

Today we’re getting even deeper into my series of StudioWorks artists with guest Julie Baldyga. I feel that most of Julie’s work centers around her interest in how things work—be it people or machines.

Julie’s body of work is mostly made up of oil pastel scenes of mechanics working on various machines. The figures in her pieces tend to be women engineers, scientists, and mechanics. She says her interest in machinery came from her father’s job working in a whiskey bottling plant, when she was a child.

Julie’s work also consist of many three dimensional pieces, like her life sized sculptures called ‘Heavenly People’.  ‘Heavenly People’ are sculptures of friends, family, and celebrities as Julie imagines they will look in heaven. Many of the first sculptures came with skeletal systems, arteries, and organs that she made from various wire & found materials. Julie has made numerous sculptures like these (as seen above in the video courtesy of Tom Stagg via Youtube.)

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

To learn more about Julie, you can check out these links:

StudioWorks Facebook page

‘The Expressive Art Of Julie Baldyga’

Julie guest appearance on LVA’s radio show PUBLIC, from their archive

Zoomgroup.org

Of course, once you’re done with all that, listen to our chat below.

Enjoy.

 

Joshua Jenkins : July 1st, 2015

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A Portrait of Five” by Joshua Jenkins. Just to give you an idea of scale, the dimensions are 64x59in.

Looking at Joshua’s work, his influences seem to span many styles, places, and periods—a love of Picasso, bits of the Harlem Renaissance, and street art. He also acknowledges what the classic painters have passed down to us, though he’s far from a traditionalist.

Greetings listeners.

Today, I’m talking about Joshua Jenkins. Joshua is a freelance artist and the coordinator for the LVA‘s Artebella program. His work tends to be large scale, mixed media abstracts that range from portraits to scenes of daily life. Joshua’s interest in art grew when he discovered Picasso’s prolific body of work. For him, this was a realization of what art could be was much more than the classic Renaissance painters.

Joshua uses a very layered technique blending text, color fields, and abstract figures, all with a very bold and expressive brushstroke.

portraitofaking2

‘Portrait of a King 2’ by Joshua Jenkins.

You can get a better understanding of his work at www.joshjenkins.com or www.facebook.com/joshuajenkinsart.

Listen to our chat using the player below.

Enjoy.