StudioWorks, Julie Baldyga: January 6th, 2016

Happy New Year listeners. I hope everyone is having a nice winter so far. I hope you’re all staying warm, staying safe…

Today we’re getting even deeper into my series of StudioWorks artists with guest Julie Baldyga. I feel that most of Julie’s work centers around her interest in how things work—be it people or machines.

Julie’s body of work is mostly made up of oil pastel scenes of mechanics working on various machines. The figures in her pieces tend to be women engineers, scientists, and mechanics. She says her interest in machinery came from her father’s job working in a whiskey bottling plant, when she was a child.

Julie’s work also consist of many three dimensional pieces, like her life sized sculptures called ‘Heavenly People’.  ‘Heavenly People’ are sculptures of friends, family, and celebrities as Julie imagines they will look in heaven. Many of the first sculptures came with skeletal systems, arteries, and organs that she made from various wire & found materials. Julie has made numerous sculptures like these (as seen above in the video courtesy of Tom Stagg via Youtube.)

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

To learn more about Julie, you can check out these links:

StudioWorks Facebook page

‘The Expressive Art Of Julie Baldyga’

Julie guest appearance on LVA’s radio show PUBLIC, from their archive

Zoomgroup.org

Of course, once you’re done with all that, listen to our chat below.

Enjoy.

 

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Shapin/Nicolas Collection : January 7th, 2015

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Happy New Year listeners!

I hope you enjoy the first episode of 2015. I’d like to introduce today’s guests with this thought: When thinking about the art world I think it’s easy to forget about those who collect art, because frankly, there aren’t a lot of individuals who do it…at least not seriously. And considering certain economic and logistic factors such as mounting, physical space, etc it makes sense that collecting is a dying trend. After artists, the most important thing to make up a ‘scene’ is a forum for displaying and viewing work, which needs funds to survive. My guests certainly understand these issues, and are doing their part in helping our city’s creative culture.

Today’s chat is with Larry Shapin and Ladonna Nicolas. Larry and Ladonna own work from over 300 Kentucky based artists; most of which are right here in Louisville. Their collection has grown so large that they built an addition onto their home to display the works. Both of them come from art backgrounds, are educated in creative fields, and Larry’s mother is one of the founding members of the Speed Art Museum. In saying that, Larry has been exposed to art from a very young age and continued to support it as an adult.

We discuss the importance of having personal relationships with artists, future plans for their space, up & coming creatives, and Louisville’s art scene.

I’d like to personally thank them for being such a great source of encouragement and support for our city’s artists. Give our discussion a listen and I think you’ll agree.

Till next time.

 

January 1st, 2014

Happy New Year, listeners!

Unfortunately due to unforeseen illness, I don’t have an interview for you today. I understand it’s not exactly the way to start a new year, but you can’t tame nature…or the flu. I’m slowly getting back to my normal, motivated self. I promise you something next week.

Above is an awesome video my friend Colin showed me. The clip is from an installation that was in The Curve, Barbican, London. The artist, Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, created a walk-though aviary for a flock of zebra finches, furnished with electric guitars and other musical instruments. As the birds go about their routine activities, perching on or feeding from the various pieces of equipment, they create a captivating, live soundscape.