Andrew Cozzens : December 14th, 2016

slide-2

Greetings listeners.

Obviously, we all know what an hour is, and how long it takes-60 minutes. But what does it feel like? Could you judge an hour’s worth of time without a clock? Or does even the idea of distancing yourself from such a device cause you anxiety?

With the world of schedules, business meetings, and appointments we’re all heavily reliant on time telling machines to help us be where we need to be when we need to be there. Some times though, an overly rigid schedule can have negative effects…

My guest today is Andy Cozzens. Andy is a professor at the Kentucky College of Art & Design as well as an established artist in Louisville’s art scene. He is incredible interested in the progression of time, and his work plays on our perception of it. With many of his pieces, he hopes the viewer finds a therapeutic quality and stop for a moment of calm. And much like interacting with Andy’s art, the creation requires taking time, slowing down—Andy does hours of tests, research, and planning for all his work. Andy is yet another victim of a full schedule, so these hours can be as beneficial as any meditation.

To learn more about Andy & his work, you can visit andrewcozzens.com.

As always, click the player below or subscribe to the podcast in the iTunes store.

Enjoy

Advertisements

Claire Krueger : April 6th, 2016

Hey listeners!

Sarah and I are on ‘Spring Break’ this week, and I’m posting from Joshua Tree, California. It is so beautiful and serene out here…

Anyway, my guest today is Claire Krueger. We chatted about film, perfectionism, and our issues with patience & commitment…(I’m somewhat kidding about my patience.)

Though Claire dabbles in many forms of art, film is the main emphasis of her creative output. Many of her films are mixed media, or maybe a better way to say it is mixed techniques—such as diorama sets, green screening, and animation. Visually, there is usually vibrant colors and dreamlike imagery (see her film ‘The Passenger’ above.)

As you may gather from the interview, there is a wit and humor to Claire. This definitely shows in her work, in subtle ways. It’s something I really appreciate about her art. Along with this well executed wit, I think there is a certain amount of mystery and vagueness to her work that leaves the audience with questions. I feel this works in her favor, bringing the viewer back again and again.

locus_4WEB

Image from Claire’s installation ‘Locus’. Image via Claire’s website.

Give our discussion a listen, to understand more about Claire and her work. You can also visit her website, clairekrueger.com as well as her vimeo.

As always, find the podcast below. Enjoy.

StudioWorks, Julie Baldyga: January 6th, 2016

Happy New Year listeners. I hope everyone is having a nice winter so far. I hope you’re all staying warm, staying safe…

Today we’re getting even deeper into my series of StudioWorks artists with guest Julie Baldyga. I feel that most of Julie’s work centers around her interest in how things work—be it people or machines.

Julie’s body of work is mostly made up of oil pastel scenes of mechanics working on various machines. The figures in her pieces tend to be women engineers, scientists, and mechanics. She says her interest in machinery came from her father’s job working in a whiskey bottling plant, when she was a child.

Julie’s work also consist of many three dimensional pieces, like her life sized sculptures called ‘Heavenly People’.  ‘Heavenly People’ are sculptures of friends, family, and celebrities as Julie imagines they will look in heaven. Many of the first sculptures came with skeletal systems, arteries, and organs that she made from various wire & found materials. Julie has made numerous sculptures like these (as seen above in the video courtesy of Tom Stagg via Youtube.)

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

Julie at work. Photo via The StudioWorks Facebook page.

To learn more about Julie, you can check out these links:

StudioWorks Facebook page

‘The Expressive Art Of Julie Baldyga’

Julie guest appearance on LVA’s radio show PUBLIC, from their archive

Zoomgroup.org

Of course, once you’re done with all that, listen to our chat below.

Enjoy.

 

Angela St. Vrain: August 12th, 2015

Alley On Burnett At 2nd St. Photo by Martin Criss

Alley On Burnett At 2nd St. Photo by Martin Criss

Greetings listeners.

My guest today is influenced by the Japanese aesthetic known as Wabi-sabi. Wabi-sabi is defined as an aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. Basically, finding the beauty in imperfections or the incomplete. Angela St. Vrain is someone who finds joy in imperfections and most times, accentuates them.

Angela is currently an undergrad student over at U of L’s Hite Institute for Sculpture. She uses a variety of materials and processes. And the breadth of her work is based on the theme of shelter, and how our homes help construct who we are.

Many of her pieces are recreations of specific spaces in her biography, but still can be relatable to the audience as houses tend to be a universal symbol of home.

Camelback House

Camelback House

To learn more about Angela’s amazing work, check out angelastvrain.wordpress.com.

To hear the chat we had in her studio, use the player below or subscribe to the podcast via the iTunes store.

Ps. Because I know I’m so bad at pronunciation, and I don’t have any knowledge of African languages, I’m providing a link to the musician I mention in the beginning of the episode: Check it out!

 

Emily Schuhmann : February 25th, 2015

cropped-jan9strainsfamiliar

Emily Schuhmann’s piece ‘L4 Pattern’.

Multimedia artist Alejandro Jodorowsky once said ‘ A symbol permits an infinite variety of meanings, one for every individual who perceives it.’

Emily Schuhmann is a creative who shares such sentiments. You’ll soon learn to what extent as she is my guest today.

Emily teaches art courses at Bellarmine University, as well as teaches dance as a Swing dance instructor. When she isn’t leading a class, she’s creating works primarily in the medium of metals. Aside from sculpting, her creative output includes illustration and performance.

Thematically, she is interested in symbols with layered meanings, as well as our tendency to use old information as a reference for new experiences and ideas. And as I already mentioned, Emily is really intrigued by audience interpretation and perspective; sort of in the way of the old saying ‘ Beauty is in the eye of the beholder’. She delights in how the language of symbols is interpreted by each viewer, and welcomes ‘misinterpretation’.

Her most recent exhibition, Strains Familiar, refers to both a recent ‘mysterious’ injury and her love of modern biology. This series touches on the concepts of repetition, patterns, and surprising parallels. The show ran earlier in the month at the McGrath gallery on Bellarmine’s campus.

To get a better sense, check out our discussion below, and get it right from the source.

You can also learn more about Emily at her website emilyschuhmann.com.

Enjoy.

 

Nathan Hendrickson : January 28th 2015

440a92b3a2bee08d867763f4c9993912

Nathan’s piece ‘Suzy Homemaker’.

Hello listeners.

My guest today is creative Nathaniel Hendrickson. Nathan has had his hand in art as creator, performer, and curator. He received a B.A. from Bellarmine University in 2012, and has since been shown in a large variety of exhibitions as well as curated for the Land of Tomorrow gallery space.

Our conversation left me with much to think about, and I believe this feeling aptly sums up the nature of Nathan’s work. Much of his work provokes thought through the communication of significant images. Nathan feels pictures can be quite powerful in our increasingly heavy image economy.

The themes of his work are often colored by his daily reflections of mass culture and his appetite for research— especially the subject of psychology. His newest exhibition at Swanson Contemporary, Surrogate Surface, was inspired by Harry Harlow’s studies with rhesus monkeys.

The show runs till February 14th.

Learn more about Nathan’s various works at his website http://nathanielhendrickson.com.

As always check out our discussion using the player below or subscribe to the podcast via iTunes.

 

Collin Lloyd : December 3rd 2014

Winter is upon us listeners. How are you fairing? Well, I hope…

Today’s guest is Collin Lloyd. The above video piece is a collaboration between him and his spouse Alexia Serpentini. If you guys remember, I spoke to Alexia during the first year of Blind Date. And much like her interview, we ended up talking for quite awhile, going all over the place. With that said, you may need to be ready to get comfy for this one, or make this two sittings…

Collin’s work centers around themes of masculinity, femininity, gender, identity construction, and his inner life. Besides his sculpture and performance work, he has been writing a novel based on his dreams which form a consistent ongoing story. As you’ll hear in our discussion, narratives are something quite close to his heart as well as his work. We also touch on gender inequality and its results in many parts of culture.

You can learn more about his work at his website, collinlloyd.com.

Happy listening…